CFP: Mediating, Constructing and Dismantling Race(ism)

10th December 2019

International Conference Organised by: Communication and Media Research Institute & The Centre for the Study of Democracy at the University of Westminster, UK

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EXTENDED DEADLINE FOR ABSTRACTS

The New deadline for abstracts is Tuesday 21st January 2020. Successful applicants will be notified by Tuesday 28th of January 2020. Abstracts should be 250 words. They must include the presenter’s name, affiliation, email and postal address, together with the title of the paper and a 150-word biographical note on the presenter. Please send all these items together in a single Word file, not as pdf, and entitle the file and message with ‘CAMRI 2020’ followed by your surname. The file should be sent by email to both: Dr Miriyam Aouragh (m.aouragh@westminster.ac.uk) and Dr Tarik Sabry (sabryt@westminster.ac.uk)


 

The Conference:

Date: 17 April 2020
Venue: The Boardroom 309 Regent Campus, University of Westminster, London, W1B 2HW

Keynote Speakers
Professor Ghassan Hage, University of Melbourne, Australia
Professor Dibyesh Anand, University of Westminster, UK

CONFERENCE CALL FOR PAPERS

Institutional and structural racism are major realities that impede different areas of social life, both domestically and internationally. Over the past decade, mass protests in West Asia, North Africa, South America, and other parts of the world created an important transformative momentum, which in turn triggered debates about race, cultural difference and the role of anti-racism in grassroots politics against authoritarianism. The (not so) new issues activists are facing include migration, modern forms of slavery, backlash against indigenous assertion, the plight of south-Asian and African (domestic, construction) workers, the trafficking of female migrants across Europe, colourism and the mainstreaming of Far Right politics speaking against liberal multiculturalism in the defence of the imagined majority.

The 2020 International Conference: Mediating, Constructing, Dismantling Race(ism) is centred around the notion of ‘Race’ and its different cogent variations – ‘racism’, ‘racialisation’, ‘racialised’ – but brings race into conversation with global capitalism, transnational political processes, historical and contemporary social change and technological mediation. Firstly, the conference welcomes papers that explore a new economy of power relations and its interdependency with resistance; this particular connection remains largely understudied in relation to race and racism in non-western contexts. Secondly, we are interested in focusing on ‘transversal’ struggles that are not limited to one county, or necessarily confined to a particular political or economic form of government, but as a form of power that applies itself to everyday life, categorises, makes individuals subjects, subjugates and makes subject too. In this respect, and thirdly, the conference also encourages contributions that may focus on ‘immediate’ struggles that are closer to individuals and their everyday experiences and act as vantage points from which to critique instances of power. Although many campaigns focus on ‘immediate’ struggles that have initiated a scathing critique of nationalism and nativism; of exclusionary discourses of citizenship vis-à-vis minority communities; of rationalisations of beauty; we are interested in approaches that embed the way modern subjectivities are constructed in particular ethnographic social hierarchies, and invite frameworks that trace these convergences along the ways capital flows create the conditions under which colonial manifestations (such as slavery) return. More precisely:

 

This conference invites speakers to ask: 

  1. How is the notion of race historically (re)constructed through socio, economic, religious and technological contexts?
  2. What is the relationship of racism and capitalism in the context of the media and ideology?
  3. How are ideas around race mediated through channels of knowledge production and in turn hegemonised?
  4. What are the formal and informal media platforms that disseminate ideas about race?
  5. How does race politics function in non-white contexts?
  6. How is race mediated in everyday life in institutions and communities in different parts of the world? And
  7. How are the ensuing processes of othering resisted, undone and thus dismantled against the backdrop of global crises?

These are but a few relevant lines of investigation. We invite papers from across the world that critically deconstruct the politics of race beyond the usual binaries of the ‘west-and the rest’ and focus on the complex and fluid inter and intra-dynamics through which notions of race/racialism are constructed, maintained and dismantled. We are also keen to solicit theoretically innovative, empirically rich and conceptually thought-provoking presentations that are able to empirically illuminate phenomena around race formations. We don’t only value papers that describe these problematics, but also those that address ways to dismantle structural racism and create positive change for peoples’ everyday realities. This thematic is one that demands a combination of theory and practice. We have programmed two internationally renowned keynotes to shed broader light through theoretical and practical areas of investigation.

This event is an initiative of the Communication and Media Research Institute’s newly established Global Media Research Network (GMRN) and the Centre for the Study of Democracy at the University of Westminster. The full-day conference on the 17th of April 2020 provides a space to debate these questions; to understand the often-contentious relationship between theory and practice across disciplines; and to bring the work of activists and academics closer together. This event is part of the underlying aspiration to encourage critical collaboration between scholars and activists.

Academic-activist Keynote Speakers
Lucia Kula, Black Student Support Coordinator, SOAS
Akram Salhab, organiser at Migrants Organise
Chardine Taylor-Stone, Cultural Producer and Writer

 

PROGRAMME AND REGISTRATION

This one-day conference on Friday, 17th of April 2020, will consist of 2 academic keynote presentations, four parallel panel sessions and 3 academic-activist keynote presentations. The fee for registration for all participants, including presenters, will be £45, with a concessionary rate of £15 for students and unwaged, to cover all conference documentation, refreshments and administration costs.

 

EXTENDED DEADLINE FOR ABSTRACTS

The New deadline for abstracts is Tuesday 21st January 2020. Successful applicants will be notified by Tuesday 28th of January 2020. Abstracts should be 250 words. They must include the presenter’s name, affiliation, email and postal address, together with the title of the paper and a 150-word biographical note on the presenter. Please send all these items together in a single Word file, not as pdf, and entitle the file and message with ‘CAMRI 2020’ followed by your surname. The file should be sent by email to both: Dr Miriyam Aouragh (m.aouragh@westminster.ac.uk) and Dr Tarik Sabry (sabryt@westminster.ac.uk)

 

Conference Organisation Committee and Advisory Board:

Miriyam Aouragh
Christian Fuchs
Deborah Husbands
Geetanjali Kala
Ben Pitcher
Pablo Morales
Tarik Sabry
Doug Specht
Roza Tsagarousianou

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