Oct
26
Thu
Digital Sociology or How to Have a Problem with Bias? – Noortje Marres @ Regent Street Campus
Oct 26 @ 5:00 pm – 7:00 pm
Digital Sociology or How to Have a Problem with Bias? - Noortje Marres @ Regent Street Campus | England | United Kingdom

Digital Sociology has reinvented social research, and with this re-invention came new problems such as bias. Noortje Marres’s talk will discusses the distinctive ways in which problems of bias arise in online environments, and introduce experimental tactics of the digital sociology to open up for engaging with them. Her talk will distinguish between different types of bias that arise in digital practices to develop a critical argument: source bias continues to be privileged at the expense of the others in our not-quite digital culture.

Biography
Noortje Marres is Associate Professor in the Centre for Interdisciplinary Methodologies (CIM) at the University of Warwick (UK). She studied sociology and philosophy of science and technology at the University of Amsterdam, and conducted her doctoral research at that same university and MinesTech in Paris. Her early work drew on actor-network theory and Pragmatism to develop the concept of issue publics, and she has played a leading role in developments in digital methods, in particular issue mapping. Her first book, Material Participation: Technology, the Environment and Everyday Publics (Palgrave) came out in paperback in 2015 and her second book, Digital Sociology, has just been published with Polity. Her website is www.noortjemarres.net.

Nov
9
Thu
The Bolshevik Revolution and Media Studies – Peter Goodwin @ Regent Street Campus
Nov 9 @ 5:00 pm – 7:00 pm
The Bolshevik Revolution and Media Studies - Peter Goodwin @ Regent Street Campus | England | United Kingdom

On the centenary of the October Revolution Peter Goodwin suggests that the Bolsheviks still have some things to teach contemporary media studies about the dynamics of political communication.

Biography

Peter Goodwin is a principal research fellow in CAMRI. He has worked at the University of Westminster for more than twenty years, where he has been amongst other things Head of the Department of Journalism and Mass Communication and Faculty Research Director for Media, Arts and Design. He pas published on media policy and the political economy of the media.

Nov
18
Sat
BBC Local Radio 50th Anniversary Symposium @ University of Westminster
Nov 18 @ 9:30 am – 4:30 pm
BBC Local Radio 50th Anniversary Symposium @ University of Westminster | England | United Kingdom

Join us for a one-day symposium to mark the 50th Anniversary of the launch of BBC Local Radio, presented by the Communication and Media Research Institute (CAMRI) at the University of Westminster with support from the Radio Studies Network /MECCSA.

In 1967, an important milestone in radio history was laid down. The BBC, after much deliberation and research, began to build a network of local radio stations across England. Notwithstanding its ambivalent relationship with the ‘nations and regions’ service, the BBC has, through its local broadcasting provision, made a profound contribution to the radio ecology of the UK. Indeed, BBC Local Radio continues to be a significant feature of the contemporary media landscape in serving local audiences in the 21st century.

The symposium includes panel discussions and papers, covering a range of subjects including:

  • News provision and journalism on local radio
  • Ethnic minority and specialist programmes
  • Sports coverage
  • The relationship between BBC, commercial local radio and community radio
  • Local Radio and the Nations
  • Interacting with audiences.

There’s also a panel chaired by Trevor Dann, discussing the legacy of local radio from the perspective of those who have worked on it, including the former Head of Local Radio Training Robert McLeish.

Nov
22
Wed
The Internet of Things – Mercedes Bunz & Graham Meikle @ Regent Street Campus
Nov 22 @ 5:00 pm – 7:00 pm
The Internet of Things - Mercedes Bunz & Graham Meikle @ Regent Street Campus | England | United Kingdom

More objects and devices are connected to digital networks than ever before. Things – from your phone to your car, from the heating to the lights in your house – have gathered the ability to sense their environments and create information about what is happening. Things have become media, able both to generate and communicate information.

In this talk that launches their new book, Graham Meikle and Mercedes Bunz discuss its promises of convenience and the breaking of new frontiers in communication. They also raise urgent questions regarding ubiquitous surveillance, networked sensors, and artificial intelligence, as well as the transformation of intimate personal information into commercial data.

Biographies
Graham Meikle is Professor of Communication and Digital Media at the University of Westminster. His books include Social Media (Routledge 2016), Media Convergence (with Sherman Young, Palgrave Macmillan 2012) and The Routledge Companion to Media and Activism (editor, forthcoming 2018).

Mercedes Bunz is Senior Lecturer at CAMRI, University of Westminster. Her books include The Silent Revolution: How Digitalization Transforms Knowledge, Work, Journalism, and Politics Without Making Too Much Noise (Palgrave 2014). She co-edited Terra Critica: Symptoms of our Planetary Condition (Meson Press 2017) for which she contributed chapters on technology, work and capital (open access, download here).

Dec
7
Thu
New Geographies of Communication – David Morley @ Regent Street Campus
Dec 7 @ 5:00 pm – 7:00 pm
New Geographies of Communication - David Morley @ Regent Street Campus | England | United Kingdom

This talk will address contemporary theorisations of the new ‘teletechnologies’ and their capacities to transcend social divisions and to compress space and time – supposedly leading to the much-advertised ‘death of geography’. All this is occuring in the context not only of processes of globalisation and de-territorialisation and the rise of new forms of (hyper) mobility, but also of the proliferation of boundary-policing. The talk will take, as its empirical foci, three contemporary emblems of mobility – the migrant, the mobile phone and the container box.

My concerns lie at the interface of communications and cultural geography and I will pose questions as to how we can best understand the changing relations between the virtual and the material realms (and between modes of communications and transport) in the contemporary world. [Image: World travel and communications recorded on Twitter by Eric Fischer – CC BY 2.o]

About the speaker
David Morley is Professor of Communications in the Department of Media and Communications, Goldsmiths College, University of London. His publications include Spaces of Identity (with Kevin Robins) , Routledge 1996;  Home Territories (Routledge 2001); Media, Modernity and Technology (Routledge, 2006) and most recently Communications and Mobility (Blackwell 2017)