Nov
22
Thu
Empowered: Popular Feminism and Popular Misogyny @ University of Westminster
Nov 22 @ 5:00 pm – 7:00 pm
Empowered: Popular Feminism and Popular Misogyny @ University of Westminster | England | United Kingdom

Sarah Banet-Weiser (London School of Economics) – Empowered: Popular Feminism and Popular Misogyny

In 2017, we are living in a moment in North America and Europe where feminism has become, somewhat incredibly, popular. It seems as if everywhere you turn, there is an expression of feminism—on a t-shirt, in a movie, in the lyrics of a pop song, in an inspirational Instagram post. There are many different feminisms that currently circulate in popular culture across all media platforms, some connecting with synergy, others struggling for priority and visibility. But feminism is not the only popular phenomenon we need to contend with in the early 21st century. For every popular feminist practice or expression, there is always an accompanying hostile rejoinder or challenge, regardless of the mediated space in which it occurred — whether that was social media, or the legal realm, or corporate culture.

In this talk, Professor Banet-Weiser will discuss the ways in which contemporary popular feminism re-imagines and re-directs what “empowerment” means for girls and women, and how it is restructuring feminist politics within neoliberal culture. For many, a broader acceptance of feminism as an identity, concept, and practice is exhilarating; yet, for those who find feminism to be a threat, this acceptance also stimulates fear, trepidation, aggression, and violence. This talk is about the deeply entwined relationship between the creation and expression of popular feminism and what Professor Banet-Weiser calls popular misogyny.

Biography

Sarah Banet-Weiser is Professor and Head of Department in Media and Communications at the London School of Economics and Political Science. She is the author of four books, The Most Beautiful Girl in the World: Beauty Pageants and National Identity (1999); Kids Rule! Nickelodeon and Consumer Citizenship (2007); Authentic™: Brand Culture and the Politics of Ambivalence (2012); and Empowered: Popular Feminism and Popular Misogyny (2018). She is the co-editor of three volumes, Cable Visions: Television Beyond Broadcasting (2007); Commodity Activism: Cultural Resistance in Neoliberal Times (2012), and the forthcoming Racism Post-Race (2019). She is currently the co-editor of Communication, Culture & Critique.

Nov
28
Wed
The ‘globalisation of Chinese social sciences’ – and a comparative and comprehensive search on the theme ‘Chinese civilisation and comparison’ in some digital databases in the West and CNKI @ University of Westminster (A7.04, Harrow)
Nov 28 @ 2:00 pm – 4:00 pm
The ‘globalisation of Chinese social sciences’ – and a comparative and comprehensive search on the theme ‘Chinese civilisation and comparison’ in some digital databases in the West and CNKI @ University of Westminster (A7.04, Harrow) | England | United Kingdom

OPEN TO ALL

Abstract: Based on one of the authors’ experiences in social scientific studies on China in the UK for more than two decades, we assert that Chinese social sciences have not been accorded their rightful prominence in general social science studies. This paper will introduce Chinese social sciences, discussing their institutions, resources and methodology, and explain why we are keen to promote the globalisation of Chinese social sciences. It will then demonstrate a case of literature search on the keywords ‘Chinese civilisation’ and ‘comparison’, comparing the CNKI database and some digital libraries in the West.

Mrs. Ingrid Cranfield

Mrs Ingrid Cranfield, BA (Syd.), PGCE, QTLS, MSET, FRGS, LLG (Enfield), Deputy Director of Global China Institute, President and Principal Editor of Global China Press; Former Deputy Mayor of the Borough of Enfield. As an author, editor, translator and lecturer, her career began at the Royal Geographical Society, which holds the largest private map library in the world, accessioning maps and advising researchers and writers. She is the author of 13 books and has edited thousands of books, articles and other works, in print and online. She was a Senior Editor on The Dictionary of Art (Macmillan Publishers). She taught English to college students and was a lecturer and supervisor of trainee teachers. She has been a school governor in London for 30 years and is a member of the International Commission on Couple and Family Relations.

Notes: This is also one of the Global China Media Seminar Series(GCMSS), co-organised with Global China Institute http://www.gci-uk.org/global-china-media-seminar-series

If you have any inquiry about CMC events, please contact Alja Kranjec at: A.Kranjec@westminster.ac.uk

Nov
29
Thu
The Impact of Digital Technologies on the Newspaper Press in Mainland China @ University of Westminster
Nov 29 @ 5:00 pm – 7:00 pm
The Impact of Digital Technologies on the Newspaper Press in Mainland China @ University of Westminster | England | United Kingdom

Colin Sparks (Hong Kong Baptist University) – The Impact of Digital Technologies on the Newspaper Press in Mainland China

This contribution reviews the impact of digital technologies on Chinese newspapers. The diffusion of the smartphone has precipitated severe economic problems for the printed press. There have been falls in both readership and advertising revenues, which have had an effect on the structure of provincial-level press groups. The decline in economic viability has been felt most severely by the commercially-oriented titles, while the more politically-oriented papers have led the way in finding new sources of funding. These sources tend to tie journalism more tightly to political and economic power and for commercial goals to replace journalistic ones. This shifting balance of economic power has important consequences for the possibility of independent and critical journalism. The empirical material is specific to China, but it highlights more general theoretical questions as to the political economy of the media.

Biography

Professor Colin Sparks studied at Sussex, Oxford and Birmingham universities, receiving a doctoral degree from the Centre for Contemporary Cultural Studies. For many years, he taught at the University of Westminster, where he directed the Communication and Media Research Institute (CAMRI). He joined Hong Kong Baptist University in August 2011. He has taught courses on a range of topics such as media and communication theory, critical theories of the media, new media and society, and comparative and international media. His research interests include media in transitional societies, comparative media systems and the impact of new media on media systems.

Dec
5
Wed
Crossing the River by Feeling for the Stones: Contesting Models of Marketization and the Development of China’s Long- Term Care Service @ University of Westminster (A7.04, Harrow)
Dec 5 @ 2:00 pm – 4:00 pm
Crossing the River by Feeling for the Stones: Contesting Models of Marketization and the Development of China's Long- Term Care Service @ University of Westminster (A7.04, Harrow) | England | United Kingdom

OPEN TO ALL

Abstract: Across the globe, many countries are experiencing rapidly growing need for public provision of long-term care services. Compared to developed countries such as Germany and the U.S., this challenge is particularly acute in China where the demographic shifts are occurring at a faster rate and the capacity for family to provide long-term care (LTC) is declining much more rapidly. Incorporating market mechanism into public provision of long-term care (LTC) is part of a global trend featuring the liberalization of policies and politics during the past four decades. From a political-economic perspective, this presentation examines how the market mechanism has been used in the delivery of public long-term care service in Germany, the U.S. and China. It also examines the lessons that China has learned and can further learn from the German and American experiences, as it charts its path forward to develop a full-fledged “Elder Care System with Chinese Characteristics.”

Dr. Luo Baozhen

Dr. Luo Baozhen is an associate professor in Sociology at Western Washington University and an affiliate researcher of the Claude Pepper Center at Florida State University. Luo’s research examines China and its people’s presence on the global stage, politically, economically, and culturally. Population aging is a central focus of her current research agenda. In addition to producing scholarly works, she also hosts a column called “Four Dimension Channel” (四维频道) discussing a wide range of topics related to elder care policies, cultures, and practices at www.thepaper.cn
(澎湃新闻) based in Shanghai. She has also written for Foreign Affairs and served as a regular commentator for China’s Global Television Network.

Notes: This is also one of the Global China Media Seminar Series(GCMSS), co-organised with Global China Institute http://www.gci-uk.org/global-china-media-seminar-series

If you have any inquiry about CMC events, please contact Alja Kranjec at: A.Kranjec@westminster.ac.uk

Dec
6
Thu
Media Coverage of Hate Speech and Discriminative Discourse in Turkey @ University of Westminster
Dec 6 @ 5:00 pm – 7:00 pm
Media Coverage of Hate Speech and Discriminative Discourse in Turkey @ University of Westminster | England | United Kingdom

Yasemin İnceoğlu – Media Coverage of Hate Speech and Discriminative Discourse in Turkey

The synopsis of this seminar is to unveil the existence and the rise of hate speech in the absence of an independent, accountable, transparent media and figure out the solutions and recommendations to combat with it. Polarization between different segments of Turkish society is becoming more pronounced and intolerance more widespread. The mainstream media reproduce and pump hate, both openly and disguisedly based on concepts such as racism, ethnical prejudice, xenophobia and anti-Semitism. Media reinforce the prejudice against these marginalized groups – “the others” and at the same time make them feel unprotected and defenceless. This hate shows itself in outbursts of social lynch and discrimination and it reinforces the polarization in the society. “Hate speech” is a complicated and controversial term that is difficult to understand. The question “What is hate speech?” brings with it questions such as “Where is the boundary between freedom of expression and hate speech?”, “Is hate speech only produced against persons or minority people/groups?”, “Does every discourse that involves negative expressions and sentiments constitute hate speech?”, “How can we explain the relationship between hate speech and hate crimes?” we will address these questions by giving different examples of hate speech disseminated or produced/reproduced by the Turkish media. Throughout the seminar examples of hate speech towards political groups/ethnic origins, refugees, LGBTI groups, disabled ones etc. will be provided.

Biography

Yasemin İnceoğlu is an Emeritus Professor of Journalism as well as a member of the UNESCO International Clearinghouse on Children and Violence on the Screen and of the American Biography Institute. She was a visiting scholar at Columbia University (1994), University of Salzburg (2003), New Delhi University (2014) and the European University Institute (2017). She is one of the founding members of the Media Watch Platform in Turkey (2008).

Yasemin İnceoğlu has been involved in several research projects and is/has been on the advisory board of initiatives investigating hate speech and hate crimes in the press. She has published several books, for example on political campaigning, women in the media and female journalists, hate speech and hate crimes, media and minorities and internet and activism. Her areas of research include international media, war and the media, persuasive communication and hate speech. She teaches Alternative Media and Journalism Rights, Communication Ethics, International Communication and Theories and Models of Communication.